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U.K. study finds new COVID variant may be more deadly

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Potential customers check old books at a stall in the Rastro flea market in Madrid, Spain, today. Spain’s Health Ministry said Friday that the country had now passed the 1-million mark for the number of people who have received the complete two-dose vaccine. Spain has administered 2.4 million doses overall. It hopes to have 70% of its 47 million population vaccinated before September.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    Potential customers check old books at a stall in the Rastro flea market in Madrid, Spain, today. Spain’s Health Ministry said Friday that the country had now passed the 1-million mark for the number of people who have received the complete two-dose vaccine. Spain has administered 2.4 million doses overall. It hopes to have 70% of its 47 million population vaccinated before September.

LONDON >> U.K. government scientific advisers say the COVID-19 variant now predominant in the country may be up to 70% more deadly than previous variants, underscoring concerns about how mutations may change the characteristics of the disease.

The findings from the New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group, published Friday on the government’s website, build on preliminary research released Jan. 21. The group includes experts from universities and public agencies across the U.K.

The new report is based on analysis of a dozen studies that found the so-called Kent variant, named after the county where it was first identified, is likely 30% to 70% more deadly than other variants. The studies compared hospitalization and death rates among people infected with the variant and those infected with other variants.

The results of the analysis are worrisome, said Dr. David Strain, a clinical senior lecturer at the University of Exeter Medical School and the clinical lead for COVID at the Royal Devon & Exeter Hospital.

“The higher transmissibility means that people who were previously at low risk of catching COVID (particularly younger fitter females) are now catching it and ending up in hospital,″ Strain said. “This is highlighted by the latest figures for hospitalization that now suggest almost 50:50 male to female ratio compared to this being predominantly in men during the first wave.″

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