comscore Kapolei woman, 27, dies after fall from Luakaha Falls in Nuuanu
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Kapolei woman, 27, dies after fall from Luakaha Falls in Nuuanu

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A woman who died after falling up to 50 feet from a waterfall at Luakaha Falls Trail in Nuuanu Thursday has been identified as Christyn Fragas, 27, of Kapolei.

The Honolulu Medical Examiner’s office said today that the cause and manner of death are pending.

At 12:13 p.m. Thursday, Honolulu firefighters responded to a 911 call for a woman who was unconscious after a 40- to 50-foot fall from a waterfall at Luakaha Falls Trail, accessed via what is popularly known as the Lulumahu Falls Trail in Nuuanu. Five units with 16 personnel responded, with the first arriving on scene at 12:26 p.m.

Firefighters hiked up the trail and found the patient at 12:43 p.m. and took over CPR from bystanders. According to the Honolulu Fire Department, the woman had no pulse, was not breathing and was unresponsive when firefighters arrived.

HFD’s Air 1 helicopter airlifted the woman to a nearby landing zone at the Board of Water pumping station, where care was transferred to Emergency Medical Services at 12:53 p.m.

EMS treated her with advanced life support and took her in critical condition to a hospital.

Day permits are required from the state Division of Forestry and Wildlife to access Lulumahu Falls, which is on restricted watershed property. Luakaha Falls and Lulumahu Falls are near each other within the same watershed forest reserve, but the pemit is required only for Lulumahu Falls, not the entire area.

The Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources lists the Judd loop trail in Nuuanu as one of its Na Ala Hele trails, and warns that sensitive cultural sites such as Kaniakapupu, which has been vandalized in the past, are closed.

The permit asks applicants to clean their hiking boots and clothing prior to entry to prevent the spreading of noxious weeds. It also notes the area is open to public hunting and lists hazards, including falling rocks, slippery rocks, flash floods and falling trees.

The trail has become increasingly popular and is widely featured in online blogs and posts.

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