New case of hepatitis A confirmed in Waikiki restaurant worker
  • Sunday, June 16, 2019
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New case of hepatitis A confirmed in Waikiki restaurant worker

The state health department on Sunday confirmed a new case of hepatitis A today in a food service worker on Oahu.

The infected person worked at Chart House Waikiki, located at 1765 Ala Moana Blvd., between Sept. 1-4 and 8-11. However, the likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low, health officials said.

The latest case brings the total of confirmed hepatitis A cases in the outbreak to 271.

“The cause of the outbreak has been identified as frozen scallops that were served uncooked, but the long period of incubation, up to 50 days, means we could see cases of hepatitis A into October,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park.

“We will continue to inform the public regarding infected food handlers so that customers who may have been exposed during those service dates can consult their healthcare provider, especially if exposure was in the past two weeks and the customer might still be able to receive vaccination or immune globulin to prevent infection.”

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  • There needs to be some disclosure whether these new cases are from the original source of eating tainted scallops or from very close relationship contact with someone who ate scallops. Are there ANY confirmed cases where someone got infected from a secondary source such as touching a contaminated surface in a restroom, contaminated door handle or other public areas? What is the true risk of a person getting infected while going about everyday business in public places?

      • I totally disagree with ukublue on his rail propaganda but agree with him that more information needs to be included with all of these new cases such as the simple statement that each new person infected identified they ate at Genki a few weeks ago and had the sushi with raw scallops mixed in. In fact there should be a request for ALL people who ate at Genki and had the sushi with raw scallops mixed in to report to the DOH and they will get a free HepA shot if they haven’t already got one already; either their insurance will cover it or Oahu rail funds will be diverted to pay for Hep A shots for these people. If ANY of these 271 or newer cases did NOT eat at Genki and had the scallop encrusted sushi, then Uku is correct, you are getting secondary source infection and that is a problem which means the number of people getting infected in Hawaii will not stop, even after temporarily closing down Genki and prevent them from serving raw scallops from the Philippines.

  • The DOH keeps saying “likelihood that patrons of this business will become infected is very low”. If that’s true why do they also say they will “continue to inform the public regarding infected food handlers so that customers who may have been exposed during those service dates can consult their healthcare provider”?

    Are food handlers more likely to infect other or not?

    • By making a public statement like that, the DOH leaves the door open for a law suit against the agency and, by extension, the taxpayers for any further incident which might occur. By allowing the establishment to remain open to serve the public, any possible legal action is probable in this litigious society looking for the deepest pockets. Steps like the Genki action may be the best course of action, whether imposed or voluntary. Just this article will produce an appreciable decline in business.

    • apparently they did because if they hadn’t they’d be a source of the hap A outbreak too. if you’re paranoid about food poisoning then don’t eat out ANYWHERE. the fact is most of these eateries with an infected worker have been clean restaurants and NONE of these restaurants have been identified in spreading hep A. your odds of getting sick eating elsewhere are just as good if not better if you happened to choose a restaurant with bad food safety practices.

  • Drip, Drip, Drip. Another food worker added to the body count. DOH continues to keep a tally but not much else.
    The spread of Hep A does not appear to be slowing. Most troubling is the number of food service workers who have come down with Hep A.
    They now seem to be the vectors of the disease but why is that?? Is there another vector of the disease that has not been reported by DOH??

  • DOH fails to indicate that sanitation inspections have been upped or any positive steps have been improved to further curtail the spread. Perhaps info regarding sanitation rating of restaurant will also indicate to public whether establishment is doing everything to keep to their client safe?

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