comscore Building of new Aloha Stadium seen as vital economic stimulus | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Sports

Building of new Aloha Stadium seen as vital economic stimulus

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                The clouds turn orange over Aloha Stadium as the sunsets during the college football game between Air Force and Hawaii, Oct. 19, 2019.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    The clouds turn orange over Aloha Stadium as the sunsets during the college football game between Air Force and Hawaii, Oct. 19, 2019.

The state formally began the solicitation process for the building of the New Aloha Stadium Entertainment District by issuing a request for qualifications from potential partners Friday, a project some lawmakers say will be key for post COVID-19 economic stimulus.

“What we still need to remember is that while we are dealing with the health matters during this challenging time of COVID-19, that doesn’t mean projects that have been funded need to stop,” said Rep. Sylvia Luke. “The Aloha Stadium project will be one of the economic drivers for the state, and because of that we need it more than ever before.”

The Legislature last year appropriated up to $350 million in bonds and general funds for the building of the facility.

State Sen. Glenn Wakai said, “The project is important for the economic recovery of Hawaii. I mean, you look at our recent past, TMT is going nowhere, the Nanakuli Wind Farm just got scuttled and the rail project is in neutral. (Aloha Stadium) is the only foreseeable project on the horizon that is going to put a lot of people to work.”

The 61-page RFQ was posted on the state Public Works website from which interested parties can download specifications for their responses.

The RFQ asks potential developers to list their experience and qualifications to partner with the state in building a replacement for the current 45-year-old Aloha Stadium as well as development of the remainder of the 98-acre site the current facility sits on in Halawa for ancillary commercial, retail and residential development.

Respondents are required to list their design and construction, facilities management experience and capabilities and financial capacities.

The stadium portion is projected to open in time for the University of Hawaii’s September 2023 home football season opener.

Interested parties in the public-private partnership — or P3 — have until April 28 to submit their RFQ replies. The state said a five-member special committee will review and vet the responses and select up to three to receive a request for proposal.

RFP respondents will be asked to post a $250,000 “security deposit/bond.”

After the RFP’s are received the state will choose a developer to partner with on the NASED project.

“We’re very pleased with the level of interest we have received from experienced developers and construction industry experts about the (RFQ) document,” Chris Kinimaka, public works administrator for the state Department of Accounting and General Services, said in a statement.

“This bodes well for the NASED project and its prospects for identifying a highly qualified P3 partner. I anticipate we’ll have a strong pool of companies to consider for receipt of the request for proposal (RFP), which is the next step in the process,” Kinimaka’s statement said.

GOALS FOR NASED

>> Create an inviting destination through the addition of mixed use developments incorporating entertainment, retail and hospitality facilities, anchored by an appropriately sized, world class stadium;

>> Heighten the area’s use as a community gathering place through the provision of spaces for cultural programs and public events;

>> Maximize district-wide value for money to the State of Hawai’i that is compatible with applicable delivery methods, market demand, economic feasibility and social aspirations;

>> Support a green network and infrastructure through establishing active, open, and community spaces;

>> Promote connectivity between the New Aloha Stadium and the Halawa/Aloha Stadium HART Station;

>> Increase accessibility to the site through multimodal connectivity and accessibility;

>> Encourage a variety of lifestyles through residential and housing diversity that may include both housing for residents and accommodations for visitors;

>> Build consensus by promoting community engagement, input and interaction during the planning process; and

>> Create an executable development plan for an urban entertainment destination that is community-centric and appropriate for Hawai’i.

Source: State RFQ

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature
Comments (43)

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines.

Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.

Scroll Up