comscore Former Honolulu Mayor Eileen Anderson dies at 93 | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Former Honolulu Mayor Eileen Anderson dies at 93

  • STAR-ADVERTISER / 1981
                                Mayor Eileen Anderson spoke at a swearing-in ceremony for 374 recently elected Oahu Neighborhood Board members on May 15, 1981.

    STAR-ADVERTISER / 1981

    Mayor Eileen Anderson spoke at a swearing-in ceremony for 374 recently elected Oahu Neighborhood Board members on May 15, 1981.

  • STAR-ADVERTISER / JULY 1982
                                Ukulele whiz Sheri-Lyn Cabbab taught Honolulu Mayor Eileen Anderson a few tunes. Anderson died on Nov. 3rd at the age of 93.

    STAR-ADVERTISER / JULY 1982

    Ukulele whiz Sheri-Lyn Cabbab taught Honolulu Mayor Eileen Anderson a few tunes. Anderson died on Nov. 3rd at the age of 93.

Former Honolulu Mayor Eileen Anderson died on Nov. 3 at the age of 93.

Anderson was the first, and only woman ever elected to hold the mayoral seat in Honolulu. She held the office from 1981 to 1985.

“The City and County of Honolulu mourns the loss of former Mayor Eileen Anderson,” said Honolulu Mayor Rick Blangiardi in a news release. “She is a terrific role model for all young girls, and for all the scrappy underdogs who dream of great things. Her contributions to the City will live on in perpetuity.”

Anderson beat popular incumbent mayor Frank Fasi in 1980, earning 70% of the vote. She was also named “Woman of the Year” by Hawaii Business Magazine.

Anderson was a pioneer before winning the mayor seat.

Under Gov. George Ariyoshi, she served as the first state director of the Department of Budget and Finance.

“Former Mayor Anderson was a trailblazer who was an inspiration to girls and young women who aspire to enter the political arena or become leaders in their chosen fields,” said Gov. David Ige.

“Dawn and I express our deepest condolences to her family and loved ones.”

Anderson and her husband Clifford were active in other community service groups as well such as Boy and Girls Scouts, Aloha United Way and Kaneohe Little League.

Anderson’s daughter, Patricia Anderson emphasized her parent’s dedication to public service, even when it came to making tough choices for the city.

“With the job of leading the City and County of Honolulu, came the responsibility of making difficult decisions that wouldn’t please everyone,” she said in a news release.

“Decisions whether in transportation, tourism, land, or business & industry, would have long term fiscal impacts that ultimately filtered down to the Ohana and Aina of Oahu… We are proud of her accomplishments and the legacy she leaves behind.”

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