comscore Bars protest invasion, drop Russian vodka in favor of Ukraine’s | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Top News

Bars protest invasion, drop Russian vodka in favor of Ukraine’s

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2013
                                An empty space on a liquor shelf where Russian vodka used to be located at The Sidetrack, a gay bar on the north side of Chicago.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2013

    An empty space on a liquor shelf where Russian vodka used to be located at The Sidetrack, a gay bar on the north side of Chicago.

Some bars and liquor stores think they’ve found a potent way to punish Russia for invading Ukraine: They’re pulling Russian vodka off their shelves and promoting Ukrainian brands instead.

“I woke up yesterday morning, and I saw that Russia had invaded Ukraine. You wonder what you can do,” said Bob Quay, owner of Bob’s Bar in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “The U.S. obviously is putting on sanctions. I thought I would put on sanctions as well.”

So he rid his shelves of the old Soviet brand Stolichnaya and started promoting Ukraine’s Vektor. “We have a sign above it that says: Support Ukraine.”

Quay announced the move on Facebook, and “it blew up. We’ve got people coming in who’ve never been in the bar before.”

Likewise, the Southern Spirits liquor store in Indian Land, South Carolina, is doing a booming business in the Ukrainian vodka Kozak after pulling Russian brands off its shelves.

“It’s selling out a lot faster than we thought,” said general manager Drew Podrebarac. “It’s been awesome.”

The Magic Mountain ski resort in Londonderry, Vermont, posted a video on Twitter showing an employee pouring Stolichnaya down the drain and saying: “Sorry, we don’t serve Russian products here.”

In Canada, the Liquor Control Board of Ontario on Friday announced that “all products produced in Russia will be removed from LCBO channels,” including 679 of its stores across the province. It also promised to accept the return of any Russian products and declared that it “stands with Ukraine, its people, and the Ukrainian Canadian community here in Ontario.

In Grand Rapids, Quay said he may never sell Russian products again. And he’s taken another step: “I’ve ordered a Ukrainian flag, and that will be going up next week.”

Comments (1)

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines.

Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.

Click here to see our full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak. Submit your coronavirus news tip.

Be the first to know
Get web push notifications from Star-Advertiser when the next breaking story happens — it's FREE! You just need a supported web browser.
Subscribe for this feature

Scroll Up