Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Tuesday, June 18, 2024 85° Today's Paper


Top News

Blinken announces $2B more in military aid to Ukraine

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/POOL VIA REUTERS
                                U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a meeting in Kyiv today. Blinken announced in Kyiv the release of a further $2 billion in military aid for Ukrainian forces holding back Russian onslaughts across the front line.
1/2
Swipe or click to see more

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/POOL VIA REUTERS

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a meeting in Kyiv today. Blinken announced in Kyiv the release of a further $2 billion in military aid for Ukrainian forces holding back Russian onslaughts across the front line.

REUTERS/VALENTYN OGIRENKO / MAY 14
                                Firefighters work at a site of a Russian air strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Kharkiv, Ukraine.
2/2
Swipe or click to see more

REUTERS/VALENTYN OGIRENKO / MAY 14

Firefighters work at a site of a Russian air strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/POOL VIA REUTERS
                                U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a meeting in Kyiv today. Blinken announced in Kyiv the release of a further $2 billion in military aid for Ukrainian forces holding back Russian onslaughts across the front line.
REUTERS/VALENTYN OGIRENKO / MAY 14
                                Firefighters work at a site of a Russian air strike, amid Russia’s attack on Ukraine, in Kharkiv, Ukraine.

Related Photo Gallery

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken visits Ukraine

Secretary of State Antony Blinken said the U.S. is accelerating arms supplies to Ukraine as President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s military confronts a Russian assault on the nation’s northeast.

Kremlin troops are attempting to push deeper into the Kharkiv region, taking control of some villages close to the border, after weeks of intensified air strikes against Ukraine’s second-biggest city. The offensive is stretching Ukraine’s forces and may push Kyiv to redeploy units from the long front line in the east.

“Everyone’s eyes are focused on the situation in the east and northeast, Kharkiv in particular,” Blinken told reporters in Kyiv Wednesday at a briefing with his counterpart, Dmytro Kuleba. “We’re rushing ammunition, armored vehicles, missiles, air defenses. Rushing them to get to the front lines, to protect soldiers, protect civilians.”

Ukrainian Commander-in-Chief Oleksandr Syrskyi is in the Kharkiv region to oversee the situation on the front, “making all decisions based on the overall situation,” said Serhiy Nykyforov, a spokesman for Zelenskyy. Additional forces have been sent to the northeastern region, according to the president’s office.

Zelenskyy himself has canceled all foreign trips scheduled for the coming days.

Ukrainian troops have “partially pushed out the enemy” from the town of Vovchansk in the Kharkiv region, the military said on Telegram. The General Staff also disputed a Russian claim to have recaptured Robotyne near the front line in the southern Zaporizhzhia region. The deserted village was the center of heavy fighting and one of three Russian lines of defense in the area last year.

Blinken, who was making a two-day trip to Kyiv, announced $2 billion in foreign military financing, using a first-of-its-kind Defense Enterprise Fund.

It helps Kyiv to buy weapons — including from other countries — and to invest in the Ukrainian defense industry. Foreign military financing typically is used only to purchase U.S.-made weapons and services. According to a State Department official, the $2 billion includes $1.6 billion from the supplemental spending package approved by Congress after a six-month delay and $400 million of previously unallocated FMF funds.

“When a Ukrainian infantryman or artilleryman has everything that he or she needs, we are winning,” Kuleba said. “Every time there are delays in supplies or insufficient supplies, we are not winning.”


Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Terms of Service. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. Report comments if you believe they do not follow our guidelines. Having trouble with comments? Learn more here.