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Kokua Line

Library began using e-mail last year to notify patrons

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Question: Why is it that the state library spends so much on postage to let you know the book you requested is in? I use the library frequently, so I know just on my books alone it is costing them a lot per year. I realize everyone doesn’t use e-mail, but the ones who do would save the library a lot of money. It would also lessen the time a book is out of circulation since the book wouldn’t be on a shelf while the mail has to reach the person being notified. I was told they don’t have the necessary software.

Answer: Library officials were surprised at your complaint. The Hawaii State Public Library System has had e-mail notification for reserved and overdue items since July 2009, said spokesman Paul H. Mark.

There may have been a miscommunication regarding the notification process, and "we apologize if that was the case," he said.

So far, more than 41,500 people have requested e-mail notification, and 175,503 e-mails were sent between July 15, 2009, and July 14. That amounted to a savings of $50,868.73 in postage and postcard costs, Mark said.

He said the e-mail option has been publicized through the library system’s Holo I Mua newsletter, its website (www.librarieshawaii.org) and via thousands of informational bookmarks handed out to patrons.

"We will continue our efforts to inform patrons about this cost-effective, environmentally friendly and timesaving method," Mark said.

To receive e-mail notices, just visit any public library and present your valid library card and PIN.

Question: Can you get the lyrics to Keali’i Reichel’s song "Maunaleo"? Such a beautiful song and voice, and I would really like to know what he is singing.

Answer: We found the lyrics and translation online.

Reichel wrote the song with Puakea Nogelmeier, University of Hawaii associate professor of Hawaiian language. The song is about Reichel’s mother, Lei.

Lyrics: He aloha no ‘o Maunaleo/I lohia e ke kilihuna/Kohu ‘ahu’ao no ka uka/He kamalani kamaehu kau i ka hanoe/He kamalei, kamahiwa pa i ka lani e

Po’ohina i ka ‘ohu kolo/Kahiko no ka poli ‘olu/Apo ‘ia e na kualono/He hi’ina, hi’alo, alohae/Hi’ipoli, hi’ilei, hi’ilanie

Eia ku’u lei aloha/No Maunaleo i ka nani/’Ohu’ohu i ka Malie/He kamalani kamaehu kau i ka hanoe/He kamalei, kamahiwa pa i ka lani e

No Maunaleo ke aloha ku i ka la’i e

Aloha e, aloha e

Translation (from Reichel’s album "Melelana"):

Beloved indeed in Maunaleo/Sparkling in the light, wind-blown rain/A finely woven cloak for the highlands/A cherished one, respected for power and strength/Esteemed, treasured, touched by heaven

Capped by the silver of the rolling mists/An adornment for that gentle heart/Embraced by the surrounding ridges/One to hold close, to hold near, to love/One dear to the heart, precious, exalted

This is my garland of affection/For Maunaleo in its beauty/Glorified by the Malie breeze/A cherished one, respected for power and strength/Esteemed, treasured, touched by heaven

For Maunaleo is the serenity of deep love/Beloved are you, beloved indeed

AUWE

To the guy who crossed a busy Kaneohe intersection as the light turned red with three little girls drinking Icees behind him. Either you are colorblind, can’t read or just plain dumb! – Concerned

 

Write to "Kokua Line" at Honolulu Star-Advertiser, 7 Waterfront Plaza, Suite 210, 500 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu 96813; call 529-4773; fax 529-4750; or e-mail kokualine@staradvertiser.com.

 

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