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Kaena Point expedition

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    20120922-5350 FTR KAENA POINT Ken Suzuki leads a Hawaii Nature Center hike to Kaena Point starting from the end of Farrington Hwy. on the Waianae side of Ka'ena Point. The trail follows an old railroad bed and former dirt road that runs along the westernmost point on Oahu. The trail leads to Ka'ena Point Natural Area Reserve that is protected by a fence preventing dogs and other predators from entering the last coastal sand dune habitat on the island and home to native plants and seabirds. Hawaiian monk seals frequent the area. Participants included Pauline Kawamata, Steve Poor, Denel McDowell, Kristen Gagesch, Monica Szczupider and Jenna Gatzke. The monk seal (on the right) was resting in this pool of water near the shoreline at the western most point of Oahu when another monk seal entered the protected pool of water causing the monk seal on the right to become aggressive and chase the other monk seal away. PHOTO BY DENNIS ODA. SEPT. 22, 2012.
  • DENNIS ODA
    Hikers enjoy wide vistas along the coast on the way to the Kaena Point Natural Area Reserve.
  • DENNIS ODA / doda@staradvertiser.com

    Steve Poor, left, and Ken Suzuki explore Keawaula Cave on a Kaena Point hike. Suzuki led the Hawaii Nature Center excursion for adults.

  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Ken Suzuki led a Hawaii Nature Center hike to Kaena Point earlier this month. It started from the end of Farrington Highway on the Waianae side of Kaena Point. The trail followed an old railroad bed and former dirt road that ran along the westernmost point on Oahu. Participants included Pauline Kawamata, Steve Poor, Denel McDowell, Kristen Gagesch, Monica Szczupider and Jenna Gatzke. Above, Poor exits a cave that has its entrance along the rocky coastline.
  • DENNIS ODA / DODA@STARADVERTISER.COM
    Steve Poor settles on a rock in the Kaena Point Natural Area Reserve to write in his hiking journal.
  • DENNIS ODA
    Young wedge-tailed shearwaters, still with their down feathers, can be found in shallow burrows along the trails, protected within the reserve from predators.

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