Despite reports, Kilauea eruption not causing gems to rain from sky | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Despite reports, Kilauea eruption not causing gems to rain from sky

  • COURTESY U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    A laze (lava haze) plume rises from the northern side of the fissure 8 lava flow margins in the former Kapoho Bay at the town of Kapoho on the island of Hawaii on June 19. The Associated Press has found that stories circulating on the internet that the ongoing eruption of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii is causing crystals to rain from the sky are untrue.

The ongoing eruption of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii is not causing crystals to rain from the sky despite reports of residents finding little green gems in the area.

“Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Is Literally Raining Gemstones Now, And We Want Some,” said one headline, with reports on the phenomena also picked up by newspapers and magazines. They all featured photos of small stones said to be olivine, which were tweeted by a woman who identified herself as a meteorologist in Arizona.

The woman, Erin Jordan, told the Associated Press in a Twitter message her friends who found the stones live in Kalapana, Hawaii. The Big Island community is about 12 miles from the neighborhoods where a series of lava fissures have opened up in the ground since early May.

While olivine is a common mineral in Hawaiian lava, and it is embedded inside the lava that has been bursting out of fissures near the Kilauea volcano, sizeable rocks of actual olivine “gems” are not showering down, scientists say.

Photos posted of olivine on social media are “definitely not what we’re seeing in the lava,” Cheryl Gansecki, a geologist at the University of Hawaii’s Hilo campus on the Big Island, told reporters last week during a U.S. Geological Survey briefing. They could be from much older lava flows, she said.

“There’s not olivine raining from the sky, except in clumps of lava,” Gansecki said. “I think this is pretty much a nonstory, unfortunately.”

“What we’re seeing are tiny and they do no separate from the lava themselves,” she said. “You’d have to crush the lava to get them out and find them.”

Michael Garcia, a professor of geology at the University of Hawaii’s Manoa campus in Honolulu, has a student who is extracting olivine from a 1985 eruption. The olivine extracted from lightly crushing pumice-like material in unpolished form is gray, not shiny and green, which it becomes after being weathered over time, Garcia said.

Olivine is the reason the Big Island has a green sandy beach, he said.

In gemstone form, a variety of olivine is known as peridot.

But most of the Hawaii olivine is not typically gemstone quality, Garcia said: “Too small and broken.”

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