comscore Letters: Spend time outside to combat coronavirus; Caring for one another; Natatorium’s future | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Editorial | Letters

Letters: Spend time outside to combat coronavirus; Caring for one another; Natatorium’s future

The article by William Cole about summer weather and coronavirus is helpful (“Jury out on whether summer will tamp down coronavirus,” Star-Advertiser, March 17).

The quote — “Three things the virus does not like: 1, sunlight. 2, temperature. 3, humidity” — should encourage everyone to spend more time enjoying our beautiful weather here.

The comment that vitamin D “reduces incidence of acute respiratory infection” is very important. We need to keep our parks open and available for all people. Spending more time outside should be encouraged, and seems to be helpful.

Charlotte Szarmes

Kapahulu

 

Poor headline didn’t help in virus coverage

Shame on you, Star-Advertiser. In these times of uncertainty and anxiety, we don’t need headlines such as, “Positive cases triple” (March 15). Yes, they did triple, from two to six. We just want the facts.

Susan Sakai

Hawaii Kai

 

Sensationalizing news can mislead readers

I found Sunday’s “Positive cases triple” headline (Star-Advertiser, March 15), to be a gross sensationalization of the current state of COVID-19 infections in Hawaii. While the fact that the state’s number of COVID-19 infections rose from two to six makes the headline technically true, the use of the word “triple” implies a much larger scale. This could be misleading for some readers — not to mention our out-of-state visitors — who may not have been keeping close track of the number of cases in the state.

Perhaps this headline and the subsequent article can serve as a good exercise in critical reading of informational texts for the public school students that now have an extra week of spring break.

Kimberly Shigeta

Mililani

 

Re-examine priorities, take action accordingly

I would like to commend Lee Cataluna on her timely and astute column (“Coronavirus outbreak was just a matter of time,” Star-Advertiser, March 15).

She cites homelessness and its attendant issues of sanitation, disease and deaths, hopefully giving cause for us all to be more mindful and aware of problems and conditions that demand more immediate, urgent attention — and commitment.

While we may be grateful for our still-many blessings, we can definitely devote more time and effort to re-examine our priorities and address our personal and national actions accordingly, so that there is no recurrence of such widespread crisis and outbreak.

Sam Hashimoto

Mililani

 

Be grateful for things virus can’t take away

As we have heard, upon us all a little rain must fall. We should take advantage of this time, a special commodity in itself, to be grateful for all we do have.

There are things that cannot be taken away or frightened out of us, such as faith, family and friends. As residents of this special place, we are blessed with access to beauty, open spaces and incredible scenery.

I challenge you all to find peace, humanity and spirit as we proceed through uncharted seas. We will prevail, and always have!

Michael Rosenberg

Nuuanu

 

Caring for one another will carry us through

The article, “Coronavirus concerns bring out the worst and best in shoppers” (Star-Advertiser, March 13), reveals the truth that the virus has no borders and fear has no ethnicity.

Although there are a few rude and self-interested shoppers, overall people are indeed polite and kind. Many argue why our government does not enforce a strict ban as China does.

The answer to that is our population does not need a strong hand to push us around. Most of us are educated, disciplined, kind and caring. Spreading facts and mobilizing our people to fight this pandemic is the most effective way.

Wearing a smile is always better than wearing masks in such a confusing time.

Kenneth Lam

Hawaii Kai

 

Compromise needed on Natatorium’s future

Last week I went to look at Kaimana Beach, located next to the Waikiki Natatorium. While there, I stopped and looked at the boarded-up Waikiki Natatorium entrance and the historical photos displayed there.

Having read in the newspaper about arguments between two opposing groups — one group wanting to preserve the Natatorium, the other group wanting to remove it and replace it with the preserved Natatorium arch and a beach — I could not help but think: What a waste of a valuable beach property and disgrace to let this problem fester for years.

Unless the two opposing groups compromise, this problem may exist unresolved for decades more. And at what cost and continuing loss to everyone concerned: the beachgoing public and the soldiers commemorated?

Stephen Kabei

Salt Lake


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