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New York Times / June 20
                                Windows commands over 75% of the market for personal computers, and looks to continue to maintain its position over the foreseeable future. The visitor center at Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Wash.
Tech View: New Windows 11 is boring, but it is an easy transition

When Microsoft somewhat surprisingly announced the release of Windows 11, many were caught by surprise. After all, hadn’t Microsoft said Windows 10 was going to be the last version of its venerable operating system? Now, about a year after its introduction, the initial fanfare has calmed, but folks are still wondering whether they should take the leap. What’s the verdict? Read more

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Honolulu Star-Advertiser business columnist John Agsalud.
Tech View: Protecting your DNA data could pay off in the future

With genealogy sites all the rage, many folks willingly submit DNA samples to see their family trees. For a few, unintended consequences have surfaced, at least anecdotally, some taking on the status of the urban legend “What do you mean my dad was the postman?” But it’s the unknown unintended circumstances that give us pause. Read more

NEW YORK TIMES / 2020
                                Teleworkers who use Zoom to connect with the workplace are often confronted with technical difficulties and privacy issues. A model uses a laptop for her Zoom meeting in New York.
Tech View: Staying safe in the age of remote work

When cameras were first made standard fare on laptop computers a few years back, it was common practice for discerning folks to physically block the camera to ensure they could not be unknowingly spied upon. Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Mark Zuckerberg
Tech View: University of Hawaii’s next head football coach should have been Mark Zuckerberg

The recent hiring of Timmy Chang as the next University of Hawaii football coach, along with all its twists, turns and drama, has dominated local news — so much so that another rather significant story seems to have not gained as much attention. This is the donation by Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg of $50 million to UH to help study the impact of climate change on the ocean. Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                A woman typing on a laptop.
Tech View: Cookies store information from visiting multiple sites

Last time around, we wrote about cookies and how one should deal with them. Like many technology-related topics, it was a bit abstract. A reader, let’s call him Keone, wrote in with a specific example of how cookies have affected him. It’s an interesting tale to tell, and perhaps better illustrates how internet tracking mechanisms work. Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                A woman appears on computer screen as she works at her home.
Tech View: What’s all the fuss regarding cookies on your computer?

Anyone who’s surfed the internet in the past 18 months or so should have noticed a new annoyance, usually presented as a small banner at the bottom of the screen, with a message similar to “This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site you agree to our use of cookies.” It will have links to the site’s privacy policy and a button to click signaling your acceptance. What’s all this about and how should you respond? Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS / 2020
                                When purchasing a computer, consumer-based goods are of different quality from business-based goods. An Apple iPad Pro and a Macbook Pro are displayed at an Apple store in suburban Boston.
Tech View: Consider computer’s use when buying one during the pandemic

As the pandemic wears on, so too do the associated supply chain issues. Technical goods are one of the most affected markets, and this is often felt most when purchasing computers. What used to be a straightforward process, taking just a few days from time of order to delivery, now takes weeks or even months. What can folks do to simplify such acquisitions? Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                In this May 12, 2021, file photo, the entrance of Colonial Pipeline Company in Charlotte, N.C.
Column: Anti-ransomware is needed to keep the bad guys at bay

The recent, highly publicized ransomware attack on Colonial Pipeline Co. was one of the latest in a string of attacks that have plagued businesses and government agencies. The Colonial incident was just the tip of the iceberg, concealing numerous other, less publicized events. Such attacks are ramping up at an ever-­increasing rate. What can folks do to avoid such an attack? Read more

ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                Mike Loucks sits in his home space exploration engineering office in the San Juan Islands.
Column: Several tools can measure speed of internet connection

Since the dawn of broadband internet, folks have always wondered, is my connection as fast as advertised? Is there any way to get an unbiased measurement? Obviously, the answer is yes. Otherwise, this would be an awfully short column. How, then, does one go about keeping the internet service provider honest? Read more

Honolulu Star-Advertiser business columnist John Agsalud.
Column: Protecting yourself online requires proper backups

A couple of weeks ago, it was discovered that data stolen from Facebook was available on the dark web. While the data was stolen in 2019, it can still be effectively used by bad actors today. Individuals and organizations should see this as a wake-up call to take care of their data themselves instead of assuming that everyone else will keep them safe. Read more


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