comscore Letters: Prepare for future saddled by debt; $2T CARES Act looks like socialism; Wear masks | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
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Letters: Prepare for future saddled by debt; $2T CARES Act looks like socialism; Wear masks

  • ASSOCIATED PRESS
                                House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signs the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act after it passed in the House on Capitol Hill, March 27, in Washington.

    ASSOCIATED PRESS

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signs the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act after it passed in the House on Capitol Hill, March 27, in Washington.

We need to prepare for future saddled by debt

As I read about all the wonderful payments, bailouts and assistance the federal and state governments are providing us, the question kinda hit me right in my face: Who is paying for it? We already have in excess of $1 trillion of debt on the federal books.

I can appreciate the assistance (loans, reduced interest, debt forgiveness, etc.) to employers and individuals to keep them going, for the thousands who have lost their jobs and have filed for unemployment insurance, for the payment we will be receiving — the list goes on.

How far into the future will we saddle ourselves and the future young people with this tremendous debt? It would be helpful to know what we are facing so we can be prepared for the future. I’m overwhelmed at the figures I see reported in the newspaper and on TV. What’s the bottom line?

Linda Iverson

McCully-Moiliili

 

$2 trillion CARES Act looks like socialism

Have we just experienced a unanimous agreement of our U.S. senators and representatives to vote their willingness to implement socialism as the necessary remedy to combat the COVID-19 virus impact, for the well-being of the citizenry, its businesses, and its governance, without a whisper of discussion of who is going to pay for the legislation?

Our president, eager in acceptance, affixed his signature of approval and enactment.

Will someone explain why this $2 trillion appropriation is not socialism in practice?

Joseph E. “Joe” Kelleher

Waikiki

 

Tourists must appreciate risks facing Hawaii

I’m disappointed that David Burford of Arizona apparently had his feelings hurt by the need of our officials to protect Hawaii from contamination (“Tourists scapegoat for spread of coronavirus,” Star-Advertiser, Letters, April 1). He obviously is fortunate enough to live where he has no exposure to the virus. But we aren’t. The threat to Hawaii is contamination from the mainland, as it was by Americans who went to China, Japan, Korea and Europe, and brought it to the U.S. mainland.

Hawaii’s economy depends on the kindness and patronage of tourists who are sensitive to what we are going through, and we appreciate that. But we will not be made to feel guilty by his sad, short-sighted point of view.

James Fukumoto

Aiea

 

Everyone should wear a mask to flatten curve

Jeremy Howard has several videos on YouTube in which he explains why universal mask-wearing can prevent the spread of COVID-19 and shows you how to make homemade masks. The N-95 masks protect the wearer and should be reserved for the medical community. But wearing a mask protects the community from the wearer, particularly if the wearer should have asymptomatic COVID-19.

If we all mask, we can flatten the curve of this illness immediately.

Carol Hong

Hawaii Kai

 

People require help paying rent, mortgages

What we need is help with mortgages and rent payments. The federal government should pay the mortgage and rent for people who have filed for unemployment since the coronavirus pandemic. This will help people from becoming homeless.

Ernie Itoga

Waialae Iki


KINDNESS GOING VIRAL

Even in these days overshadowed by the coronavirus, bright spots exist. If you see kindness or positivity going on, share it with our readers via a 150-word letter to the editor; email it to letters@staradvertiser.com. We’ll be running some of these uplifting letters occasionally to help keep spirits up, as we hunker down. We are all in this together.


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