comscore Letters: COVID cases are few, restrictions unnecessary; Officer set example of how to respond; Don’t let U.S. become another Venezuela | Honolulu Star-Advertiser
Editorial | Letters

Letters: COVID cases are few, restrictions unnecessary; Officer set example of how to respond; Don’t let U.S. become another Venezuela

  • JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM
                                The American Association of Orthodontists recently moved its meeting from the Hawai‘i Convention Center to Miami.

    JAMM AQUINO / JAQUINO@STARADVERTISER.COM

    The American Association of Orthodontists recently moved its meeting from the Hawai‘i Convention Center to Miami.

I’m beginning to think COVID-19 has affected the brain matter of the elected officials in this state.

For example, in the past week, Oahu has only had between 16-33 cases per day, out of a total population of almost a million people. And for that, we’re still at 50% capacity and groups of 10 indoors. And why should cases outside Hawaii affect our moving into a less restrictive tier here? The metrics are absurd.

Our Hawai‘i Convention Center recently lost a lucrative 17,000-person American Association of Orthodontists meeting to Miami because the state could not guarantee what its COVID-related travel restrictions and social distancing requirements would look like next spring (“Conventions pull out of Hawaii due to COVID restrictions,” Star-Advertiser, June 14). Ten to 11 months from now? Seriously?

Our elected officials continue to ruin the lives and spirit of countless people and businesses (not to mention a decrease in tax revenues) for a couple dozen cases per day? Wow. We’re screwed in more ways than one.

Lisa Adlong

Hauula

 

Officer set example of how to respond

My hero is a lifelong police officer. When riots in the 1960s burned his Newark community, Dad’s heart filled with understanding and compassion.

Honolulu just witnessed a Black man die, apparently for mistaking a private home for a nearby temple with a similar entry. Lindani Myeni removed his shoes before entering the home, offered apologies after realizing his mistake, and was then confronted by unknown assailants. He died before the answer to his frantic question, “Who are you?” (“Security footage shows exchange before Honolulu police shoot Lindani Myeni,” Star-Advertiser, June 16).

I suspect the home’s resident and police officers would have reacted differently if I had made that mistake. A thin white guy wouldn’t have played into the same racial stereotype as a South African.

I pray everyone will find a moment to reflect on why this polite family man was shot. What can each of us do within our own family and community to avoid repeating this tragedy? I look to my hero.

John Black

Waialae

 

A man is dead after questionable actions

Let’s see if I understand.

A woman panicked and appeared to exaggerate the situation to the 911 operator. Police officers ordered a man to get on the ground, ignoring his question, “Who are you?”

They struggle, then taser him, then shoot him. Then they identify themselves as police officers.

Initially they said he acted strange and burglarized the home, then wouldn’t answer when asked again.

Prosecutors and police did not give up camera footage.

A man is dead.

Thomas Luna

McCully

 

Media gives short shrift to San Francisco Giants

What’s going on with Major League Baseball and the TV networks? The San Francisco Giants are having the greatest start in years, leading the National League West division, playing winning baseball. But the team is snubbed by both, with no TV or radio coverage. TV has them blacked out (for reasons unknown) and radio is focused on the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers and San Diego Padres. Yet, the Giants continue to win. And I thought Rodney Dangerfield got no respect.

Me and many loyal fans deserve better treatment.

C’mon, man! Get with the program!

Go Giants!

Mel Rodenhurst

Kailua

 

Don’t let U.S. become another Venezuela

During the 1970s, I was privileged to occasionally work at a research institute outside Caracas, Venezuela, a beautiful people and land. Then, Venezuela was a flourishing economy and democracy, although no utopia.

In recent decades, Venezuela deteriorated into a hellish dystopia that I could never have imagined back then and now still find hard to imagine. Most tragically and sadly, Venezuela became a failed state, in some ways and degrees like other countries such as Lebanon, Libya, Myanmar and Syria.

It is unimaginable that America could ever become a failed state, but then that was the case for Venezuela. Numerous symptoms of failure are accumulating in America during recent years.

A substantial majority really needs to wake up and pursue effective nonviolent action in solidarity before it is too late. The extreme political polarization and paralysis have to stop, and likewise the lies, delusions and hatred.

Leslie E. Sponsel

Hawaii Kai


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