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KAUAKUKALAHALE


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Ka unuhi inoa

For Saturday, May 12, 2012

Na Kekeha Solis

POSTED:



Synopsis: There are many examples of English names that were translated into Hawaiian by first-language speakers of Hawaiian, whether they were people’s names or place names.

———

Welina e nā makamaka heluhelu o Kauakūkalahale. Ua uluhua wale paha kekahi mau kānaka i kekahi mau pule aku nei i hala i ka mo'olelo “He keu a ka hana keaka maika'i.” ‘O ka namunamu e wawā ana, 'o ia ho'i, no ke aha lā i unuhi 'ia ai ka inoa o Maluhia Honua Meka mai loko mai o ka inoa haole (Metta World Peace, a 'o Rona Alatesa ia ma mua). Hō'ike mai ana kekahi, 'a'ole kūpono ka unuhi 'ana i ka ha'iinoa pili kahi a i ka ha'iinoa pili wahi paha mai loko mai o kekahi 'ōlelo a i kekahi.

E nā makamaka heluhelu, e kupu a'e ana kekahi nīnau no ka ha'iinoa pili wahi e like paha me nā moku'āina (Mikikana, Nepalaka, a pēlā aku), nā kūlanakauhale (Kapalakiko, Kakalameko, a pēlā aku) a me nā inoa alanui paha (Alanui Vinia, Alanui Betela, a pēlā aku). A i ka 'ike 'ana aku i ia mau inoa i unuhi 'ia (ma luna a'e nei, e hō'ole mai paha kekahi, “Kā! 'A'ole ia he mau unuhi! Ua ho'ohawai'i 'ia a'e ia mau inoa.” A inā pēlā, eia mai kekahi mau inoa i unuhi 'ia, 'o ia ho'i, ke Alanui Mālawaina (Vineyard), ke Alanui Kālepa (Merchant), ke Alanui Pāpū (Fort), ke Alanui Mō'ī (King), ke Alanui Mō'ī wahine (Queen) a pēlā aku.

'O ka mea 'āpiki, 'a'ole i mōakāka i ko 'oukou mea kākau, 'o ka inoa hea lā ka inoa mua? 'O ka inoa Hawai'i, a 'o ka inoa haole paha. 'O ke alanui Mō'ī, a 'o ke alanui King. 'O wai ka mua? 'O Mō'ī ka mua, a 'o King kona hope? A 'o King paha ka mua? A 'o Mō'ī kona hope? Ua pa'i 'ia aku ke “alanui Moi” ma ka nūpepa Ka Hae Hawaii i ka makahiki 1856, a ma mua aku paha kekahi. 'Eā, he mea 'ole paha ka 'ike 'ana, 'o Mea ka mua, a 'o Mea kona hope. 'O ka mea nui, ke 'ike a'e nei kākou, he unuhi ka hana, 'o ia ho'i, ua unuhi 'ia kekahi inoa, he inoa haole (King), a he inoa Hawai'i paha (Mō'ī).

E 'ōlelo mai paha kekahi, “Kā! Pēlā wale nō nā ha'iinoa pili wahi. Akā, 'a'ole pēlā nā ha'iinoa pili kahi, e like me Limaikaika (Armstrong), Papai (H. Crabb), Wilisona lāua 'o Halekeokeo (Wilson and Whitehouse), a pēlā aku. 'Eā, ma ua mau kumu alaka'i nei ma luna a'e nei, e 'ike 'ia a'e nei, he unuhi 'i'o nō ka hana, 'a'ole i ho'ohawai'i 'ia aku ia mau inoa (koe 'o Wilisona). A 'o kekahi mea paha i mōakāka, 'o ia mau inoa haole ka mua a 'o ka inoa Hawai'i i unuhi 'ia mai loko mai o ka inoa haole kona hope.

Ke lana nei ka mana'o o ko 'oukou mea kākau, ua ahuwale ka hana a ko kākou mau kūpuna ma ka 'ōlelo makuahine a lākou. Ua unuhi nō kekahi o lākou i ka inoa Hawai'i mai loko mai o ka inoa haole, inā he ha'iinoa pili kahi, a he ha'iinoa pili wahi paha. A kohu mea lā, 'a'ohe hewa o ia. A 'o ka hana wale nō a ko 'oukou mea kākau, 'o ia ka hahai 'ana i ka hana a kona mau kūpuna. Inā 'a'ole i pilikia ke kūlana o ka 'ōlelo Hawai'i i ka 'ōlelo haole, inā ua mau ia 'ano hana a hiki i kēia lā.

('A'ole i pau.)

———

E ho'ouna 'ia mai na ā leka iā māua, 'o ia ho'i 'o Laiana Wong a me Kekeha Solis ma ka pahu leka uila ma lalo nei:

>> kwong@hawaii.edu

>> rsolis@hawaii.edu

a i ‘ole ia, ma ke kelepona:

>> 956-2627 (Laiana)

>> 956-2627 (Kekeha)

This column is coordinated by Kawaihuelani Center for Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa.





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Ken_Conklin wrote:
I appreciate this lengthy and scholarly response to my previous comment two weeks ago regarding the translation of non-Hawaiian names and places into Hawaiian. Mr. Solis has indeed provided many examples showing that during the past two centuries it has not been unusual for speakers of Hawaiian to translate names of people and places into Hawaiian and to use those translated names in ordinary discourse when referring to those people or places. My response is lengthy. To facilitate ease of reading, and ease of making replies to specific points, I'm going to post my response in short segments. I hope replies will be civil and on the topic.
on May 12,2012 | 09:02AM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
Mr. Conklin, who gave you permission to dictate others' culture? Did you forget in a democracy majority rules? Your minor opinion does not trump PROFESSOR Solis's, especially when he makes a valid point.
on May 12,2012 | 11:44AM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 12,2012 | 12:57PM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
Did you mean disgust? I wasn't addressing you, and I would venture to say you know nothing about what we discussing, SO MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS. Unless it's true you are indeed the same person as many others suspect.
on May 12,2012 | 01:25PM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 12,2012 | 03:44PM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
Now who is attacking whom? I laugh at you. Your words have no power over me, that is why your speech is FREE and worth nothing.
on May 13,2012 | 02:18PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Think: "who gave you permission to dictate others' culture?" Conklin: I'm not dictating, merely using logic and making observations. It's Hawaiian sovereignty activists who have tried to dictate that all street names must be in Hawaiian, for example. Think: "Did you forget in a democracy majority rules?" Conklin: Actually, you're the one who'd better worry about that. Hawaiians are outnumbered 4-to-1. Think: "Your minor opinion does not trump PROFESSOR Solis's, especially when he makes a valid point." Conklin: I have cited facts and used logic. And when it comes to opinions, mine are as valid as anyone's. Is Solis a professor? Not that it matters, but I have a Ph.D. and was for many years a professor. It's not good to appeal to authority in an intellectual discussion. That ended after the midaeval period.
on May 12,2012 | 07:28PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
It's normal practice in all languages to translate foreign names from languages which use different alphabets or sounds into one's own language by using corresponding alphabetical letters and sounds and following the grammatical rules of one's own language. That's called "transliteration" and I have no complaint about it. Thus, for example, "Kenneth" becomes "Keneke"; or "Captain Cook" becomes "Kapena Kuke.
on May 12,2012 | 09:03AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
However, citing a foreign-language name by translating its conceptual meaning into one's own language, is not the normal way of citing names in any other language with which I am familiar (German, Russian, Spanish, French, Italian in that order of familiarity). In German, for example, the English-language sentence "Iolani Palace is on King Street" might be translated as "Iolani Palace sitzt auf King Strasse" or perhaps "Schloss Iolani sitzt auf King Strasse" but it would never be translated as "Schloss Himmelfalke sizt auf Koenigstrasse." ["Himmelfalke" would be a translation into German of the Hawaiian concept "Hawk of heaven" and, of course, "Koenig" is the word for "King"; sorry I'm unable to make umlauts so therefore use the "e" as in the old days before the umlaut was invented]
on May 12,2012 | 09:03AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
However, citing a foreign-language name by translating its conceptual meaning into one's own language, is not the normal way of citing names in any other language with which I am familiar (German, Russian, Spanish, French, Italian in that order of familiarity). In German, for example, the English-language sentence "Iolani Palace is on King Street" might be translated as "Iolani Palace sitzt auf King Strasse" or perhaps "Schloss Iolani sitzt auf King Strasse" but it would never be translated as "Schloss Himmelfalke sizt auf Koenigstrasse."
on May 12,2012 | 09:05AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
However, citing a foreign-language name by translating its conceptual meaning into one's own language, is not the normal way of citing names in any other language with which I am familiar (German, Russian, Spanish, French, Italian in that order of familiarity).
on May 12,2012 | 09:06AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
In German, for example, the English-language sentence "Iolani Palace is on King Street" might be translated as "Iolani Palace sitzt auf King Strasse" or perhaps "Schloss Iolani sitzt auf King Strasse"
on May 12,2012 | 09:08AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
but it would never be translated as "Schloss Himmelfalke sizt auf Koenigstrasse." ["Himmelfalke" would be a translation into German of the Hawaiian concept "Hawk of heaven" and, of course, "Koenig" is the word for "King"; sorry I'm unable to make umlauts so therefore use the "e" as in the old days before the umlaut was invented]
on May 12,2012 | 09:09AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
[Comment -- the robot rejects my conceptual translation into German of the phrase "Palace Hawk of Heaven sits on Koenig Strasse -- maybe there's some sort of forbidden subword I'm unaware of.]
on May 12,2012 | 09:12AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
I'd like to know whether conceptual translation of names is customary in any of the Asian languages, or tribal languages. If someone knows, please reply with examples.
on May 12,2012 | 09:26AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
The only languages with which I am familiar other than English and Hawaiian are the European ones I mentioned. So perhaps translation of the concept of a name is customary practice in Japanese or Chinese? It would be interesting to know. It would also be interesting to know whether such conceptual translation of names is normal practice in indigenous languages, tribal languages of Africa, Mexico, or Brazil. I do hope that someone knowledgeable about one of those languages might reply, with examples.
on May 12,2012 | 09:18AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
In Japanese or Chinese is it customary to do conceptual translation of names of people or places? It would be interesting to know. I do hope that someone knowledgeable about one of those languages might reply, with examples. Likewise regarding tribal languages in Africa, Mexico, Brazil, etc.
on May 12,2012 | 09:23AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
In Japanese or Chinese is it customary to do conceptual translation of names of people or places? It would be interesting to know. I do hope that someone knowledgeable about one of those languages might reply, with examples. Likewise regarding tribal languages.
on May 12,2012 | 09:24AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Would it not seem odd to say "Drive up Mother street to get to The Lonely One school."? [Makuahine street, Kamehameha school] So why then should it not seem odd to refer to the basketball player "Metta World Peace" as "Maluhia Honua Meka"? It seems there is some sort of double standard here.
on May 12,2012 | 09:31AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Would it not seem odd to say "Drive up Mother street to get to The Lonely One school."? [Makuahine street, Kamehameha school] So why then should it not seem odd to refer to the basketball player "Metta World Peace" as "Maluhia Honua Meka"? It seems there is some sort of double standard here.
on May 12,2012 | 09:32AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
And so I reiterate my assertion from two weeks ago in followup comments, that conceptual translation of names of people and places is one small aspect of a larger strategy of using Hawaiian language as a political weapon, treating other cultures and non-Hawaiians present in Hawaii for many generations as invasive weeds to be uprooted and destroyed. For further discussion of this topic, go to Google and put in all 4 of these keywords: Hawaiian language political weapon In addition to the larger issues, there's a very large subpage devoted to several huge political controversies in both the state legislature and Honolulu city council over demands to change street names.
on May 12,2012 | 09:33AM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
You realize you broadcast your own fears to others when you rant like this.
on May 12,2012 | 11:47AM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 12,2012 | 01:02PM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
And once again, YOU NEED TO MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS. I made no attack, I asked him a question. Who gave him permission? And I did add to the conversation BY AGREEING with the Hawaiian language editor.
on May 12,2012 | 01:31PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Think to Diver: "And once again, YOU NEED TO MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS. I made no attack, I asked him a question. Who gave him permission? And I did add to the conversation BY AGREEING with the Hawaiian language editor." Conklin: What's true is everybody's business. Who gave me permission? I answered that above. I don't need permission, especially not yours. You say you added to the conversation merely by agreeing with Solis? Did you ever listen to Rush Limbaugh? People call in and say "Dittoes" or even "Megadittoes." But that does not add anything to the discussion. They're supposed to teach you in high school not merely to say you agree or disagree, but to explain why. You have not done that.
on May 12,2012 | 07:34PM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
You have no authority, and it's only a matter of time when you're so-called version of theTRUTH gets buried with you in the grave where it belongs. Enough of your ego, Mr. high and mighty don't need permission. You and old diver should take a cruise and stop taking it so seriously.
on May 13,2012 | 02:47PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
In the Bible, when God gave Adam dominion over all the creatures of the Earth, God told Adam that he could exercise and display his dominion by giving those creatures names. The act of changing the name of a person or place by translating the concept of the name into Hawaiian is a political action -- an assertion of dominion, or sovereignty. "This is our place and we shall control the names given to people and places here, but you must not change the names of our people and places in the same way." Treating foreign names this way might be normal, natural, and spontaneous for a primitive people capable of understanding things only within their own centuries-long framework in which they are totally immersed and have had little or no contact with outsiders; but I don't think Hawaiians have that as an excuse for such behavior anymore.
on May 12,2012 | 09:34AM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
I apologize for the multiple repostings of bits and pieces. Here's what happened. I broke my essay into paragraphs and tried to post each paragraph one at a time. For some of those paragraphs, the robot posted it as I had submitted it. But for a couple of paragraphs, the robot said it had been sent for approval (which has always meant that it would never be posted) So then I tried to figure out what word or phrase was causing the robot to reject it, and I revised the paragraph and tried again, and sometimes the robot still rejected it so I tried again. Then, at some point after I went away, some of the pieces that appeared to have been rejected ended up getting posted after all. So now it's quite a mess. Sorry about that. Hire a better robot. Nothing I said should be objectionable to any censor trying to protect children from foul language or obscenity.
on May 12,2012 | 07:17PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
I apologize for the multiple repostings of bits and pieces. Here's what happened. I broke my essay into paragraphs and tried to post each paragraph one at a time. For some of those paragraphs, the robot posted it as I had submitted it. But for a couple of paragraphs, the robot said it had been sent for approval (which has always meant that it would never be posted) So then I tried to figure out what word or phrase was causing the robot to reject it, and I revised the paragraph and tried again, and sometimes the robot still rejected it so I tried again. Then, at some point after I went away, some of the pieces that appeared to have been rejected ended up getting posted after all. So now it's quite a mess. Sorry about that. Hire a better robot. Nothing I said should be objectionable.
on May 12,2012 | 07:18PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
1 - irrelevant personal attack. 2 - irrelevant personal attack and appeal to authority rather than substantive discussion of the issues. Second 2 (should have been 3 but EJH can't count) - My point here was to assert that Hawaiian conceptual translation of names of places and people is something that is not done in the European languages with which I am familiar, and you have not shown evidence to the contrary, despite your silly talk about everyone getting together 10,000 years ago. 3 (should have been 4) - The examples of London and Venice clearly belong in the category of transliteration -- taking a name and putting that name into the alphabet and sound system of a different language -- the examples of London and Venice are irrelevant to my main point regarding conceptual translation of a place name or person's name by rendering it into the vocabulary that expresses that concept in a different language. Your final example of Ventimiglia --> Vingt-mille is closer to a relevant example of conceptual translation, but still doesn't quite do the job because the town's name in both languages sounds very similar and is actually a transliteration like London --> Londres. So I hope you will try to produce a better example of actual conceptual translation of the name of a place or person where the translated name has no similarity of pronunciation to the original name.
on May 13,2012 | 12:47PM
Ken_Conklin wrote:
Continuing my reply to elijahhawaii3: The example in Solis' article two weeks ago that I poked fun at was Metta World Peace --> Maluhia Honua Meka, where the Hawaiianized name does not sound anything like the English name and also has a change in word-order corresponding to the differences between the two languages -- it's a full-blown genuine conceptual translation, which I have asserted does not happen in any of the European languages with which I am familiar. So find me an example like the basketball player's name. If your example involves translation from any language (European or non-European) into a European language, you get extra credit, since I asserted that I have not seen any such conceptual translations being used in the real world. But I'll even accept an example showing actual usage of conceptual translation from any language into an Asian or tribal language, even though I made no assertion about those. It would be interesting to see any such examples, if you're capable of getting past making personal attacks.
on May 13,2012 | 12:50PM
Thinkaboutit wrote:
I have a better idea, Mr. Conklin. Why not write your own Hawaiian language article and have it published for all to scrutinize. Unless that is the editorial board will not print your articles so you resort to leaving lengthy comments no one cares to read. Rather than flooding the Internet with your nonsense, you and Diver Dave should open a university only for white people who want to pay you to learn your slanted view of history. I promise I will not sue you for discrimination.
on May 13,2012 | 02:29PM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 13,2012 | 09:56PM
8082062424 wrote:
You crack me up. From some of your other post you stated more then once your 1/4 Chickasaw Indian. it is nice to see you embrace your culture. but what the other 3/4. sad lil jealous person
on May 14,2012 | 08:02AM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 14,2012 | 09:48AM
8082062424 wrote:
You are the racist not me. i just stated a fact
on May 14,2012 | 10:54AM
DiverDave wrote:
This comment has been deleted.
on May 16,2012 | 12:43PM
Anonymous wrote:
The repsonse below that was deleted when I cancelled the account went somethign like this - YOU CANNOT CLAIM that the Hawaiian language community is excluding you when YOU make it publicly known here that you REFUSE REFUSE REFUSE to learn the Hawaiian language because you state unequivocally that it is worthless, not worth knowing. You just excluded YOURSELF by that choice. Likewise, you are not a member of the law enforcement community, not because they EXCLUDE you by DISCRIMINATION, but because YOU choose not to work in law enforcement. Your sense of logic lacks both sense and logic.
on December 28,2012 | 07:41AM
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